Gone Girl (A VO Review of the film and Fincher coolness)

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Warning: Minor Spoilers

I no longer have doubts walking into a David Fincher flick. I have a fanboy trust in his skill as a movie director. I recognize that someday he might let me down, but for now, I’ll ride the wave and admit to my unabashed admiration for his craft and style. When it comes to the early 21st century internet/tech age, when we look back 30 years from now, we should point to Fincher films as statements for the time. Paired now with the creeping dread coolness of Trent Reznor scores, it’s basically blissful.

Gone Girl continues the legacy of coolness. Sometimes while enraptured by the said coolness, there is a dissonance, as though a great film shouldn’t excite or thill this much, as though I should be taking it more seriously. Gone Girl, however, can easily be viewed with a wry smile throughout. It’s Fincher’s most comedic and satirical work since Fight Club. To be sure, the comedic tone is black. It’s a critical rumination of marital superficiality, suburban and small town life, and the 24/7 news cycle. At times the players involved feel like caricatures. When this occurs, however, it’s in the service of getting the point across. When the film drifts into this hyper-real storytelling, the experience is hypnotic rather than disengaging.

Ben Affleck plays the glib but likable white man with fleeting and mediocre ambitions. We’ve all met this sort of guy, the one whose style we dig while maintaining the feeling that we wouldn’t mind smacking him. So, Affleck basically plays himself…and it works. Rosamund Pike’s role as the leading Amy-Elliott-Dunne borders the closest to cartoonish. Eventually, though, it’s understood that this is a part of the trick. She can play any character at the flip of a switch if it advances her twisted machinations. The interplay between the leads is witty, fascinating, and when appropriate, chilling.

Gone Girl could be a lot of different things for a lot of different people; a thriller, a mystery, black comedy, small town drama, mildly soap operatic. For me, it was a contemplation on the duplicity inherent in human nature (I guess that would make it a mystery) but it’s more about the psychology and mind tricks than purely being about ‘whodunnit’. The film is masterful at arousing discomfort as viewers consider the competing and contradictory narratives.

I came away unsettled, but completely satisfied. There was definitely a psychological hangover lingering for the rest of the day. That’s often when I know a movie made an impression. It will be interesting on repeat viewings to better pick apart how Fincher pulled off this clever ruse.

Random appearances from Tyler Perry and Neil Patrick Harris worked to great effect. They reminded me of other bold choices like the casting of Justin Timberlake in The Social Network, or the recent trend in television of comedians in small dramatic roles. You wouldn’t have thought of it yourself, but when seeing it on screen, it’s an unexpected stroke of casting genius. It’s these subtle strokes that elevate Gone Girl from pulpy thriller to biting and brilliant social commentary.

From a social and philosophical perspective, Gone Girl I think is asking to what extent the gawking and voyeuristic media has cheapened or made real human connections feel stilted, awkward, or trivial. Also, toying with the audience, challenging them to consider which relationships in their lives might be built on dishonesty or half truths. The more cynical moral of the story might be that many people are living outright lies, perfectly willing to maintain the facade as an act of self preservation.

David Fincher is easy to take for a misanthropic auteur. But, there is a lightness to his touch that allows us to glimpse these darker human impulses without recoiling. Seeing this darkness can serve simple entertainment purposes or allow us to better recognize darkness in ourselves and in others. In doing so, we might prevent slow destruction via self deception. It might not be for everyone to look into the dark heart of humanity, but for those willing to explore and understand it, a self aware artistic examination from an artist like David Fincher can be a powerful tool. It doesn’t have to be taken too seriously though, as Gone Girl on the mere surface is wildly compelling.

VO Review Score: 4 ½ * out of 5 *

Quick hits

Great Album That Came Out of Nowhere: Unravelling by We Were Promised Jetpacks

New Effort to Keep Myself Sane: Turn my smart phone off and hand it over to Caitlin

Bad Habit to Break: Laying in my bed to read books…less effective

Stuff to Be On the Look Out For In Self and Others: Narcissistic self righteousness

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